Colonial craftsmen and the beginnings of American industry

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Average Rating
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press,
Pub. Date:
1999.
Edition:
Johns Hopkins paperbacks ed.
Language:
English
Description

The vanished ways of colonial America's skilled craftsmen are vividly reconstructed in this superb book by Edwin Tunis. With incomparable wit and learning, and in over 450 meticulous drawings, the author describes the working methods and products, houses and shops, town and country trades, and individual and group enterprises by which the early Americans forged the economy of the New World.

In the tiny coastal settlements, which usually sprang up around a mill or near a tanyard, the first craftsmen set up their trades. The blacksmith, cooper, joiner, weaver, cordwainer, and housewright, working alone or with several assistants, invented their own tools and devised their own methods. Soon they were making products that far surpassed their early models: the American ax was so popular that English ironmongers often labeled their own axes "American" to sell them more readily. In the town squares a colonist could have his bread baked to order, bring in his wig to be curled, have his eyeglasses ground, his medicine prescription filled, or buy snuff for his many pocket boxes. With the thriving trade in "bespoke" or made-to-order work, fine American styles evolved; many of these are priceless heirlooms now--the silverware of Paul Revere and John Coney, redware and Queensware pottery, Poyntell hand-blocked wallpaper, the Kentucky rifle, Conestoga wagon, and the iron grillework still seen in some parts of the South. The author discusses in detail many of the trades which have since developed into important industries, like papermaking, glassmaking, shipbuilding, printing, and metalworking, often reconstructing from his own careful research the complex equipment used in these enterprises.

The ingenious, liberty-loving artisans left few written records of their work, and only Mr. Tunis, with his painstaking attention to authentic detail and his vast knowledge, could present such a complete treasury of the way things were done before machines obliterated this phase of early American life.

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ISBN:
9780801862281
9780690010626
9780529034380
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Grouping Information

Grouped Work IDf93a5d37-9a76-53f5-265b-1530b7775d73
Grouping Titlecolonial craftsmen and the beginnings of american industry
Grouping Authortunis edwin
Grouping Categorybook
Last Grouping Update2019-08-29 10:33:32AM
Last Indexed2019-12-05 04:16:58AM

Solr Details

accelerated_reader_point_value0
accelerated_reader_reading_level0
authorTunis, Edwin, 1897-1973.
author_displayTunis, Edwin
available_at_aacplKuethe Genealogical Library
collection_aacplADULT
detailed_location_aacplA A Co. Archaeology Lab in Edgewater - Call 410-222-1318 to verify availability.
Kuethe Historical and Genealogical Library - Call 410-760-9679 for location and hours.
display_descriptionThe vanished ways of colonial America's skilled craftsmen are vividly reconstructed in this superb book by Edwin Tunis. With incomparable wit and learning, and in over 450 meticulous drawings, the author describes the working methods and products, houses and shops, town and country trades, and individual and group enterprises by which the early Americans forged the economy of the New World. In the tiny coastal settlements, which usually sprang up around a mill or near a tanyard, the first craftsmen set up their trades. The blacksmith, cooper, joiner, weaver, cordwainer, and housewright, working alone or with several assistants, invented their own tools and devised their own methods. Soon they were making products that far surpassed their early models; the American ax was so popular that English ironmongers often labeled their own axes "American" to sell them more readily. In the town squares a colonist could have his bread baked to order, bring in his wig to be curled, have his eyeglasses ground, his medicine prescription filled, or buy snuff for his many pocket boxes. With the thriving trade in "bespoke" or made-to-order work, fine American styles evolved; many of these are priceless heirlooms now. The silverware of Paul Revere and John Coney, redware and Queensware pottery, Poyntell hand-blocked wallpaper, the Kentucky rifle, Conestoga wagon, and the iron grillework still seen in some parts of the South. The author discusses in detail many of the trades which have since developed into important industries, like papermaking, glassmaking, shipbuilding, printing, and metalworking, often reconstructing from his own careful research the complex equipment used in these enterprises. The ingenious, liberty-loving artisans left few written records of their work, and only Mr. Tunis, with his painstaking attention to authentic detail and his vast knowledge, could present such a complete treasury of the way things were done before machines obliterated this phase of early American life.
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9780801862281
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ils:a118644431997088991815Kuethe Historical and Genealogical Library - Call 410-760-9679 for location and hours.T21 .T81falsefalseOn ShelfZ-KUETHE
itype_aacplAvailable at the A A Co. Archaeology Lab in Edgewater
Available at the Kuethe Historical and Genealogical Library
last_indexed2019-12-05T09:16:58.287Z
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local_callnumber_aacplR 680.9 T
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owning_library_aacplAnne Arundel County Public Library
owning_location_aacplKuethe Genealogical Library
primary_isbn9780801862281
publishDate1965
1999
record_details
Bib IdFormatFormat CategoryEditionLanguagePublisherPublication DatePhysical Description
ils:a512215BookBooksJohns Hopkins paperbacks ed.EnglishJohns Hopkins University Press, 1999.159 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ils:a1186444BookBooksJohns Hopkins paperbacks ed.EnglishJohns Hopkins University Press, 1999.159 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ils:a94320BookBooksEnglishThomas Y. Crowell, 1965.159 p. : ill. ; 31 cm.
recordtypegrouped_work
scoping_details_aacpl
Bib IdItem IdGrouped StatusStatusLocally OwnedAvailableHoldableBookableIn Library Use OnlyLibrary OwnedHoldable PTypesBookable PTypesLocal Url
ils:a51221531997067551291On ShelfOn Shelffalsetruefalsefalsefalsetrue
ils:a118644431997088991815On ShelfOn Shelffalsetruefalsefalsefalsetrue
subject_facetAnne Arundel County Archaeology Lab -- call 410-222-1318 to schedule an appointment
Artisans -- États-Unis -- Histoire
Artisans -- United States -- History
Decorative arts, Early American
Handicraft -- United States -- History
Industries -- United States -- History
Technology -- History
United States -- Social life and customs -- To 1775
title_displayColonial craftsmen and the beginnings of American industry
title_fullColonial craftsmen and the beginnings of American industry / written and illustrated by Edwin Tunis
Colonial craftsmen and the beginnings of American industry [Kuethe] / written and illustrated by Edwin Tunis
title_shortColonial craftsmen and the beginnings of American industry
topic_facetArtisans
Decorative arts, Early American
Handicraft
Histoire
History
Industries
Social life and customs
Technology