What We're Reading July 2024

Created on July 2, 2024, 8:10 am

Last Updated July 2, 2024, 9:22 am

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Nick Russo is a city news reporter living in NYC during the 1950s. Andy Flemming is the boss's son, set to inherit the newspaper so he starts working in the newsroom to learn the ropes. To call Andy scatterbrained would be an understatement, and grumpy Nick takes him under his wing to show him the ropes. When friendship turns into more, they have to decide if they want to fight for what they have in a time when being queer is dangerous. This book was like if Newsies was queer, and it was so soft and warm, full of domestic bliss. I loved all of the side characters, and it was low angst without being boring. - Katelyn T. (Glen Burnie Library)
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A young woman who has been through quite a lot in her short life is getting paid to work on her passion project at the job of her dreams. When a team of business partners arrives at her employer in pursuit of a corporate takeover, she is startled to see an ill-fated romantic liaison among them. Their chemistry is off the charts but complicated by their professional responsibilities. (This book is Ali's spiciest to date ) I love Ali's STEM romances because part of me wanted to be a scientist when I grew up - her writing immerses you in the world without having to take organic chemistry in college. I found myself up far later than I wanted to be because putting this book down was not an option. Fellow fans of spicy or STEMinist romances will enjoy this book. - Adrith B. (Broadneck Library)
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I loved this retelling of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from Jim’s point of view. Everett did an exceptional job with the character while bringing up a lot to mull over. If you’re looking for a summer adventure story or a great retelling of Huckleberry Finn, check this one out! - Cortney G. (Odenton Library)
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This book is a rainbow of genres rolled into one very high-octane epic. The main character, Lacey Bond, is one of the most original and complex antiheroes I've ever had the joy to follow in a story. It has everything: love and hate, a fugitive hunt, courtroom drama, murder and mayhem, and dark humor. One of the best and most unique reads of 2024. -Sharon L. (Odenton Library)
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This first adult fiction novel from the author of The Sun is Also a Star, One of Our Kind is a slow-burn thriller that combines social commentary and elements of horror. Jasmyn and her growing family move to the exclusive Black community called Liberty, hoping for a perfect life, but Jasmyn soon discovers something sinister behind the community's facade. Imagine the Jordan Peele version of The Stepford Wives complete with a shocking ending. - Sharon L. (Odenton Library)
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Piglet is living her dream. She's a foodie working at a cookbook publishing house, she's moved into a lovely home where she entertains friends, and she's about to marry a very handsome man from a very rich family. When Piglet's fiance shares a terrible secret, her life takes a very messy and surprising trajectory, replete with delicious cooking. A smart and slyly humorous book that fans of both Bridget Jones and Fleabag will appreciate. - Sharon L. (Odenton Libary)
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Set in 1950s Florida, the book blends ghost story and historical fiction to tell the story of life -and death - at the segregated Gracetown School for Boys. Robert Stephens, Jr. is the teenage witness to horrors perpetrated against the living boys in the reform school and is a seer of "haints," or spirits, of young men who share their past experiences of torture and murder at the hands of the school's director. Compelling characters and exceptional writing that will be appreciated by readers of Victor LaValle, Stephen Graham Jones, and Colson Whitehead's book The Nickel Boys. The Reformatory received the top Bram Stoker Prize for Superior Achievement in a Novel and was a Goodreads Choice Award nominee for Best in Horror. -Sharon L. (Odenton Library)
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Originally published in Swedish, this delightful collection of short stories about Maud, an 88 year old Swedish woman, delivers dark humor in an oddly cozy manner. Perhaps it's the fact that this book is quite a small tome (it can easily fit in one hand) and it had cross stitch artwork on the cover. Maud is a woman who delights in her age, travels the world, and has a proclivity for solitude. However, sometimes she has Problems. And what's an elderly lady to do when she encounters some Problems? Maud handles it, and not in the way you might expect. You might like this if you like short stories or books with dark humor for a mature audience, crime, mysteries, and murder. - Abigail W. (Broadneck Library)
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This was such a great summer read and a debut novel to boot! This beautifully written story is told from two points of view, Ruthie/Norma and her brother Joe, from a Mi‘kmaq family in Nova Scotia. During the summers, the family relocates to Maine for the blueberry picking season. When Ruthie is four, she is stolen and raised by an affluent couple. I loved how well I got to know both Norma and Joe and the many layers they absorb in life, with some heavy topics brought to the surface. Those that enjoy historical fiction with some mystery sprinkled in would probably enjoy this read. like 2 - Cortney G. (Odenton Library)
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A follow-up to An Elderly Lady Is Up to No Good, this volume has more short stories about Maud, an 88 year old Swedish woman. This book is less darkly humorous than its predecessor, but I still enjoyed it very much. Maud takes a walk down memory lane and remembers some of the other Problems she's had to solve in her life. If murder and mayhem with a humorous twist is your jam, then you might like this. - Abigail W. (Broadneck Library)
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11) Hex
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Everyone knows the legend of the Black Rock Witch in the sleepy little town of Black Spring. She's a literal living legend - as in, she walks the streets of Black Spring, appears in residents' homes, and hovers near the beds of sleeping families. Each man, woman, and child is educated on how to react to the witch, which is mostly to not react. Unprovoked, this witch, who was murdered in the 17th century and has since had her eyes and mouth stitched shut, is mostly harmless, but if she is trifled with, she paves a path of death among the citizens. The local youth take an interest in studying her scientifically and kick off a series of events that change the witch's historically known patterns challenging the citizens and revealing that the evils are rooted beyond what people thought them to be. This book isn't "scare your pants off" scary, but it does give a sense of uneasiness. I found myself more emotionally affected than scared, and it was very reflective about society and sacrifice. If you enjoy stories like "Head Full of Ghosts" and stories by Adam Neville, you'll enjoy Hex. - Mackenzie (Headquarters)
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